“yet he will own Christ, and Christ him”

Richard Sibbes describes the immense mercy of Christ for those who struggle with weaknesses, doubts, fears and sins. But this raises the question - when is an ongoing struggle with sin a weakness with which Christ and the body of Christ must be patient and merciful? And when is an ongoing struggle with sin actually... Continue Reading →

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Prodigal sons and rejected stones

  Eve Tushnet: "The Church should be the place for prodigal sons and rejected stones, at least as much as it’s the place for elder brothers and other respectable types. The early Church promised that those who gave up family or marriage to follow Jesus would find a new family, a new home, with fellow... Continue Reading →

two kinds of suffering

Henry Cloud: "I sometimes use this analogy when I speak: 'If one of you walked out of this meeting and a guy with a mask walked up to you in the dark parking lot, took out a knife, stabbed you in the stomach, took all your money, and left you in an unconscious state, you... Continue Reading →

to illustrate incomparable mercy

John Cassian (360 - 435): "And if we may illustrate the incomparable mercy of our Creator from something earthly, not as being equal in kindness but an illustration of mercy: if a tender and anxious nurse carries an infant in her bosom for a long time in order sometime to teach it to walk, and... Continue Reading →

The spiritual origin of worldly action

Rodney Stark, in his book Cities of God: the Christianization of the [Roman] empire was not the result of 'reactions to public calamity,' but to religious influences per se. That is, religion did not merely offer psychological antidotes for the misery of life; it actually made life less miserable! ...The truly revolutionary aspect of Christianity... Continue Reading →

A great nation of righteous laws

Christopher Wright, in the New Bible Commentary, on the 19th chapter of Leviticus: The chapter is remarkable for its breadth and depth of moral insight. It touches on the thoughts of the heart and the actions of the body, private and public behavior, and almost every major area of social life in a community. The... Continue Reading →

It is not the end, but it is the road.

In 1521 Martin Luther wrote: This life, therefore, is not righteousness, but growth in righteousness; not health, but healing; not being, but becoming; not rest, but exercise. We are not yet what we shall be, but we are growing toward it. The process is not yet finished, but it is going on. This is not the end, but it is the road. All does not yet... Continue Reading →

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