Where Christ shows his gracious power

Richard Sibbes, in The Bruised Reed: "When blindness and boldness, ignorance and arrogance, weakness and willfulness, meet together in men, it renders them odious to God, burdensome in society, dangerous in their counsels, disturbers of better purposes, intractable and incapable of better direction, miserable in the issue. Where Christ shows his gracious power in weakness,... Continue Reading →

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difficult beginnings and drying tears

Kathy Harrison, in her honest and moving book, Another Place at the Table: "It comes as no surprise that finding families willing to open their doors to the rigors of foster parenting is so hard. Fostering means knowing about things most of us would prefer to forget. It means recognizing that our best is often... Continue Reading →

The Game of Christian Education

  Carl Trueman, in his lectures on the Reformation, points out that though Luther said in 1520 that liturgy should be in the vernacular, he didn't make that change until 5 years later, in 1525. Why wait 5 years before making a change Luther was convicted was necessary? Trueman: "People are disturbed enough by what's... Continue Reading →

and he went out, not knowing

  "and he went out, not knowing" (Hebrews 11:8, KJV) Last night, our group was studying Genesis chapter 12, and the calling of Abraham. Such a remarkable story, the more you think of it. We were struck again by the radical nature of the call - leave everything, and go to the land I'll show... Continue Reading →

Die Heretic

Emo Philips: Once I saw this guy on a bridge about to jump. I said, "Don't do it!" He said, "Nobody loves me." I said, "God loves you. Do you believe in God?" He said, "Yes." I said, "Are you a Christian or a Jew?" He said, "A Christian." I said, "Me, too! Protestant or... Continue Reading →

Getting the Bible Inside

Eugene Peterson: "A caveat about the disciplines: I’m uneasy about the word discipline. It’s a useful word, which Richard Foster has brought back into the Protestant vocabulary. But in practice it often encourages people to take charge of their own spirituality. When you practice a discipline, you’re doingsomething. There’s not much relaxation. There’s not much... Continue Reading →

We get a completely new set of people

Thomas Long, writing in his book Accompany Them With Singing: The Christian Funeral, imagines a funeral for a wife and mother named Annette. The funeral he imagines is, like so many others, "sweet and nostalgic", featuring readings of Psalm 23 and Proverbs 31, and celebrating that she "was a good woman, a good Christian". He... Continue Reading →

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